Mercury Articles

U.S. launches landmark industry program to recover mercury

A landmark agreement was announced today that will greatly reduce a major source of mercury from the environment by creating a new, industry-funded, national program in the U.S. for recovering mercury switches from vehicles before they are dismantled and melted for recycling.

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The Lowdown on Mercury in Fluorescent Lamps

Why is it important to buy lamps with the lowest mercury content? Although a single fluorescent lamp contains only a small amount of mercury, so many of these lamps are used that their overall mercury content is very large. According to one estimate, 620 million fluorescent lamps are discarded annually in the US, releasing from 2 to 4 tons of mercury per year.

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What You Need to Know about Mercury in Fish and Shellfish

Fish and shellfish are an important part of a healthy diet. Fish and shellfish contain high-quality protein and other essential nutrients, are low in saturated fat, and contain omega-3 fatty acids. A well-balanced diet that includes a variety of fish and shellfish can contribute to heart health and children's proper growth and development. So, women and young children in particular should include fish or shellfish in their diets due to the many nutritional benefits.

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EPA Report Examines Treatment Technologies for Mercury in Soil, Waste and Water

In August, EPA released a report that contains information on the availability, performance and cost of eight technologies for the treatment of mercury in soil, waste and water.

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What About Mercury?

Some have balked at converting to CFLs because of the mercury contained in fluorescent lamps. A closer look, however, reveals that using CFLs actually reduces hazardous waste. The lead, which is also a hazardous waste, built into the base of incandescent lamps requires, in most areas, their disposal or at least that of their bases as lead-bearing hazardous waste.

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CFL Bulbs Have One Hitch: Toxic Mercury

The Environmental Protection Agency and some large business, including Wal-Mart, are aggressively promoting the sale of compact fluorescent light bulbs as a way to save energy and fight global warming. They want Americans to buy many millions of them over the coming years.

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Mercury's Rising Impact

Mercury is getting a lot of attention, both in the popular press and in state and federal regulatory agencies. Combustion systems, like coal-fired power plants, industrial boilers, incinerators, and cement kilns, are sources of mercury emissions to the air. This article outlines the mercury emission regulations that apply to different combustion systems and the best demonstrated means to control these emissions from combustion sources. This article focuses on utility and industrial combustion systems because they are the highest emitters and face the greatest reductions and tightest scrutiny.

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Researchers: Mercury's Link to Heart Disease Begins in Blood Vessel Walls

Heavy metals and other toxins have been linked to many human diseases, but determining exactly how they damage the body remains a mystery in many cases. New research focusing on a relatively obscure, misunderstood protein suggests mercury's link to heart disease can be traced to activation of this enzyme, which triggers a process leading to plaque buildup in blood vessel walls.

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Mercury in energy-saving bulbs worries scientists

NEW YORK (Reuters) - There's an old joke about the number of people it takes to change a light bulb. But because the newer energy-efficient kinds contain tiny amounts of mercury, the hard part is getting rid of them when they burn out.

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Mercury in Medical and Dental Products

All of the routine childhood immunizations are currently available in formulations that do not contain mercury or that contain only trace amounts. In the past, many vaccines contained a preservative called thimerosal, which contains ethyl mercury.

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Extent of Mercury Pollution More Widespread Than Previously Thought, According To Report

Mercury pollution is making its way into nearly every habitat in the nation, exposing countless species of wildlife to potentially harmful levels of mercury, according to a report released on Sept. 19 by the National Wildlife Federation.

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State gives warning about mercury in fish

As a brilliant sun smiled on the Carolina Beach City Marina on Thursday evening, Caleb Batson scowled while stretching a tarp atop his 40-foot cruiser.

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Durbin asks tuna firms to be 'honest' on contents

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) is calling on America's tuna industry to take steps to protect consumers from high mercury levels in some cans of tuna.

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Mercury in Fish

In America one-in-six children born every year have been exposed to mercury levels so high that they are potentially at risk for learning disabilities and motor skill impairment and short-term memory loss. That type of mercury exposure is caused by eating certain kinds of fish, which contain high levels of the toxin from both natural and man-made sources such as emissions from coal-fired power plants.

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Children's Health Article - Public Health and Economic Consequences of Methyl Mercury Toxicity to the Developing Brain

Methyl mercury is a developmental neurotoxicant. Exposure results principally from consumption by pregnant women of seafood contaminated by mercury from anthropogenic (70%) and natural (30%) sources. Throughout the 1990s, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made steady progress in reducing mercury emissions from anthropogenic sources, especially from power plants, which account for 41% of anthropogenic emissions.

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N.J. governor signs mercury switch bill

March 24 - New Jersey is the latest state requiring automakers to pay for the removal of mercury switches from junked cars prior to their being crushed, shredded and melted down for scrap.

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Study links mercury emissions to increase in autism

Mercury released primarily from coal-fired power plants may be contributing to an increase in the number of cases of autism, a Texas researcher says.

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